Nov27

Earth is (already) great

koala-sleeping

A joint letter from the Biomimicry Institute and Biomimicry 3.8.

Let’s work together to build a just world for us all, with nature as a guide.

We’ve all spent too much time inside the last few days, looking at our computers and TV screens. In that time, birds were flying south for the winter, rain was restoring thirsty hills in California, and baby koalas were being born in Australia.

A species can only thrive if its strategies are tuned to the conditions it’s in–and if it’s in beneficial relationships with others. Humans have co-existed as a species on this planet for over 200,000 years as Homo sapiens sapiens. In that time, there have been many disturbances, challenges, and tensions between and amongst us. Somehow, we have eventually learned that we are always better together than alone.

And through it all, we always asked nature for help.

Nature adapts to changing conditions, over short and long periods of time. For that reason alone, it offers us humans millions of answers on how to build a fair world that works for all species.  

We have a vibrant planet, one full of solutions to every problem we have. As we all collectively navigate this time of great change ahead, we encourage everyone to continue to look to nature. Take long walks, have conversations with birds, spend time pondering the ants.  

Go outside – enjoy it, learn from it, and protect it.

Sincerely,

Your friends at the Biomimicry Institute and Biomimicry 3.8

Aug14

Evaporation: Closing the Gap between Forest and Urban Water Flows

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By Jennifer Barnes and Alexandra Ramsden

Have you ever walked through an evergreen forest in the rain? There is a hush all around. The forest floor is spongy and soft beneath your feet, and the layers and textures all around you create a coziness, a feeling of being protected. As you take a deep breath of fresh, clean air, you know it’s raining big drops up above, but all you feel is a cool mist floating down through the canopy.

You can find expansive sections of this forest all around Puget Sound. For many people, it is a mental and spiritual health reservoir, a place that helps us reconnect and remember that we are nature. But it is also an ecosystem services powerhouse. It stores carbon, cleans the air and water, regulates temperatures, and provides shelter and food for critters big and small.

Before urban development, this forest dominated Seattle’s landscape. Dotted with bogs and meadows, with wetlands proliferating along the rich edges between forest and water, the vast majority of the region was forest. And the system operated in dynamic balance.

(more…)

Mar29

BNYC Featured in Planning Magazine

Planning Magazine_Mother Nature, Designer, Interview with Adiel Gavish

In a recent article for The American Planning Association’s publication, “Planning Magazine”, Dr. Nicola Davies explores biomimicry’s influence in urban planning. In her piece entitled, “Mother Nature, Designer: Using Biomimicry for Planning and Urban Design”, Ms. Davies sites nature inspired examples including the newly re-designed National Building Museum in Washington DC. The author makes a compelling case stating,

… designs can be adapted and transformed from structures that drain resources and energy into entire ecosystems that benefit communities, cities, and the planet.

Adiel Gavish touches on the application of ecological performance standards to resiliency planning in cities,

Because cities essentially operate at an ecologically sub-optimal level, utilizing these metrics aligns us with place-based ecological and biological standards.

Re-connecting to and meeting these standards can inform and improve resiliency planning as well as optimize investments in resilient infrastructure.

Read the full article here.