Sep22

Intro to ‘City as a Forest’ with biomimicry pioneer Chris Garvin

CHANGE IN VENUE:

Intro to ‘City as a Forest’ will now be held at ABC Carpet and Home (not at the Interface showroom).

Thursday, September 27th, 2018 from 3-5 pm

RSVP

 

DESCRIPTION

As a partner event of the Agritecture Xchange series, “Intro to City as a Forest” will provide attendees with a basic understanding of biomimicry, ecological performance standards, and how we can apply ecosystem metrics to design more sustainable, resilient cities.

“City as a Forest” aims to reconstruct the relationship between the ecosystem and the city in a mutually beneficial manner that supports all life. This is a regenerative approach to building design and community development. The goals of this effort are to connect people to natural systems, align local ecosystems with larger regional systems, and integrate comprehensive ecosystem impacts into planning and decision-making. Using this holistic approach, we can solve challenging urban problems while strengthening the connection between the built environment and nature.

Enjoy local fare and drinks while networking with other like-minded students and professionals. Questions? Contact adiel.gavish@biomimicry.org.

To be alerted to future events, sign up for our mailing list here.


About Chris Garvin

Chris Garvin is an accomplished architect and active voice in the sustainable design community. Since moving to New York in 1998, he focused on sustainable design with both Croxton Collaborative and Cook+Fox Architects. Chris joined Bill Browning and Bob Fox in 2006 to form Terrapin Bright Green, a strategic sustainability consulting firm dedicated to the rapid transformation of our built environment to create a healthy and sustainable world. During that time, Chris developed and executed a five-year biomimicry innovation program with the State of NY to support innovation in SMEs.

In 2011 he became a founding board member of the BiomimicryNYC regional network. Furthermore, he has worked with Google and Interface to integrate bio-inspired ecological metrics into the design and operations of their facilities. Chris has served as the managing partner and project lead for many of Terrapin’s engagements until departing in 2017. Currently, he is focusing his efforts on ecologically-driven solutions to reverse climate change and improve the health and resiliency in communities.

 


Graciously hosted by

ABC Home is a NYC design destination—a portal into collective creativity, integrating healing, education, theater, art and other forms of interconnectivity. With beauty + design as tools, ABC guides a conscious participant to creatively commit to nurturing the planet and its communities while actualizing home as a sacred space. ABC Carpet & Home holds a commitment to indigenous artistry, and its protection, with global cooperatives and global partnerships. To find out more about their transformational events series, please click here.

 

Organized by

 

 

In partnership with

Since 2011, Agritecture has been researching and evaluating thousands of approaches to urban agriculture. What began as a humble blog, has evolved into a global consulting business offering clients technology-agnostic guidance. As part of their ongoing commitment to accelerate the urban agriculture industry, they continue to share knowledge through their blog, wide array of events, and their do-it-yourself +Farm.

AgTech X is a community platform for learning, collaboration, and entrepreneurship within Urban Agriculture & Sustainable Food System topics. They currently run New York City’s only co-working lab that is focused solely on sustainable food & agriculture issues.

 

 


 

What is biomimicry?

Biomimicry is an approach to innovation that seeks sustainable (and net positive) solutions to human challenges by emulating nature’s time-tested patterns and strategies. The goal is to create products, processes, and policies that are well-adapted to life on earth over the long haul, and actually give back to the ecosystems of which we are an integral part. As biomimics we ask, what can we learn from nature — not, what can we take?

The core idea is that organisms and ecosystems have already solved many of the problems we are grappling with. Animals, plants, and microbes are the original engineers, innovators, aviators, and architects. After billions of years of research and development, failures are fossils, and what surrounds us is the secret to survival.

 

Header image by Chris Barbalis on Unsplash.

Mar28

Think Like an Ecosystem: Biomimicry for Social Innovation workshop in NYC

Think Like an Ecosystem:
Biomimicry for Social Innovation
June 12-14, 2018 | New York City

Biomimicry for Social Innovation Design Workshop 2-day Extension
June 15-16, 2018

Discover how to Think Like an Ecosystem during our three-day training that cross pollinates the fields of biomimicry and social innovation. Through exploration of an old growth forest inside the New York Botanical Gardens and a field trip to the shorelines of the City’s largest park, you’ll explore lessons from nature and learn how to apply this ecosystem intelligence to organizations and social innovation efforts.Have a specific opportunity or challenge you’d like to address? The Design Workshop is a two-day extension for those ready to roll up their sleeves and begin applying the concepts learned during the training to a specific issue or opportunity. Through direct coaching with our expert instructors and collaborative engagement with fellow learners, you’ll work to unpack the most applicable lessons from nature, then apply them systematically to your challenge. The Think Like an Ecosystem training is a prerequisite for this extension unless you’ve previously taken a Biomimicry Social Innovation workshop with Biomimicry 3.8.

 

LEARN MORE + REGISTER

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WHAT TO EXPECT

Each day will be brimming with content—you should plan to clear your agenda and fully immerse yourself in the biomimicry experience! You will gain new insights and new ways to unpack challenges as you explore how to apply nature’s lessons through experiential play with lessons from local ecosystems. From a homebase of the New York Botanical Gardens, workshop activities will vary from lecture time to hands on activities to fields trips that explore Pelham Bay Park, New York City’s largest park. This will be an active and fully engaged workshop, so come ready to dive in!

INSTRUCTORS

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Dr. Dayna Baumeister–Biomimicry 3.8 Co-Founder

Dr. Dayna Baumeister is a world-renowned biomimicry lecturer and consultant, as well as the Director of the Biomimicry Professional Certificate Program and Co-director of The Biomimicry Center at ASU. With a background in biology, a devotion to applied natural history, and a passion for sharing the wonders of nature with others, Dayna has worked in the field of biomimicry with business partner Janine Benyus since 1998 as a business catalyst, educator, researcher, and design consultant. As a workshop leader, she will share her 18+ years of experience bringing biological intelligence to a wide range of audiences as well as her visionary leadership for the meme.

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Toby Herzlich–Biomimicry for Social Innovation Founder

Toby Herzlich is a leadership trainer, master facilitator, certified Biomimicry Specialist, and the founder of Biomimicry for Social Innovation. Toby is committed to the creation of a just, healthy, and regenerative society, and heartfully enthused about the transformative potential of applying nature’s wisdom to humanity’s sustainability aspirations. With more than 25 years of facilitation experience, she is a Senior Trainer with the Rockwood Leadership Institute, co-founder of Cultivating Women’s Leadership, and a consultant to organizations such as the Sierra Club and the AgroEcology Fund. She finds much of her purpose in catalyzing diverse networks of social change innovators, including the Young Climate Leaders, and intends to germinate a co-evolving network of leaders using nature’s intelligence as guidance and inspiration.

SPECIAL GUEST

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Lisa Dokken–Certified Biomimicry Professional

Lisa Dokken holds one of the first Masters in Science in Biomimicry from Arizona State University and is a Certified Biomimicry Professional. Lisa lectures on biomimicry and nature based solutions at The Earth Institute, Columbia University, as well as Bard College’s MBA in Sustainability program. Prior to her diving head first into biomimicry, Lisa worked in sustainable development for the United Nations Development Programme and the Clinton Climate Initiative in Asia, Latin America and Africa. She is also on the board of directors for the BiomimicryNYC regional network.

PRICING

Price for attendance at the June 12-14, 3-day training is $1,950. Designed to be highly affordable and flexible, registration covers catered lunch each day, all activities, tuition, workshop materials, and administration costs. You will need to choose your own options for breakfast, dinner, and lodging based on your preferences.

The June 15-16 Design Workshop extension is $1,500. Registration includes catered lunch each day, all activities, tuition, workshop materials, and administration costs. The Think Like an Ecosystem 3-day training is a prerequisite for this extension, unless you’ve previously taken a Biomimicry Social Innovation workshop with Biomimicry 3.8.

You’ll see an option on the registration form to select the three-day training only, or the three-day plus two-day workshop extension.

Attendees are responsible for covering the cost of transportation and lodging, as well as breakfast and evening meals. Reserve your seat for only $500. Full payment is due April 23, 2018.

Convince your boss by downloading and sharing our new PDF that outlines the professional benefits and value biomimicry immersion workshops can add to any organization. Download Convince Your Boss pdf here.

WORKSHOP LOCATION AND ACCOMMODATIONS

The workshop will be held at the New York City Botanical Gardens in the Bronx, conveniently located across the street from the Botanical Garden station on the Metro-North Harlem line, just 20 minutes from Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan.

Attendees are responsible for arranging their own accommodations. New York offers endless lodging opportunities. There are several hotels within walking distance of the workshop. The proximity to a station allows participants to easily travel from other parts of the city. Don’t forget about VRBO or Airbnb.

REGISTRATION AND DEADLINES

Online registration forms must be completed by April 15, 2018. All instructions and pricing information is included within the form. Late registration will be accepted through May 27, 2018 pending availability. Late registrants will incur a $200 late fee.

Learn more about Immersion Workshops here

Questions? Contact us at workshops@biomimicry.net or +1 406-543-4108 *233

LEARN MORE + REGISTER

Nov29

A Cure for the Uncommon Cold

By Tom McKeag

When Arthur DeVries arrived at McMurdo Station in 1961, he was fresh from Stanford University where he had signed up for a 13-month stint to study the respiratory metabolism of the endemic Notothenioid fishes found in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Notothenioids are Antarctic icefish, a suborder of the order of Perciformes. This order is the most numerous order of vertebrates in the world and includes perch, cichlids, and sea bass. Five families of Notothenioid fish dominate the Southern Ocean, comprising over 90 percent of the fish biomass of the region. They are a key part of an entire ecosystem, but that ecosystem would not exist in its robust form if they had not evolved a way to beat the extreme cold of these polar waters. DeVries would eventually find out how.

McMurdo station is at the southern tip of Ross Island, the largest of three U.S. science installations in Antarctica. Established in 1958, McMurdo had all the fea-tures of any work camp on the edge of raw nature, with few embellishments be-yond generators, supply pallets and Quonset huts. The research community there existed in defiance of the climate, rather than because of it: recorded tem-perature extremes are as low as minus 50 degrees Celsius and average annual temperatures reside at minus 18 degrees Celsius.

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Nov27

Earth is (already) great

A joint letter from the Biomimicry Institute and Biomimicry 3.8.

Let’s work together to build a just world for us all, with nature as a guide.

We’ve all spent too much time inside the last few days, looking at our computers and TV screens. In that time, birds were flying south for the winter, rain was restoring thirsty hills in California, and baby koalas were being born in Australia.

A species can only thrive if its strategies are tuned to the conditions it’s in–and if it’s in beneficial relationships with others. Humans have co-existed as a species on this planet for over 200,000 years as Homo sapiens sapiens. In that time, there have been many disturbances, challenges, and tensions between and amongst us. Somehow, we have eventually learned that we are always better together than alone.

And through it all, we always asked nature for help.

Nature adapts to changing conditions, over short and long periods of time. For that reason alone, it offers us humans millions of answers on how to build a fair world that works for all species.  

We have a vibrant planet, one full of solutions to every problem we have. As we all collectively navigate this time of great change ahead, we encourage everyone to continue to look to nature. Take long walks, have conversations with birds, spend time pondering the ants.  

Go outside – enjoy it, learn from it, and protect it.

Sincerely,

Your friends at the Biomimicry Institute and Biomimicry 3.8

Oct10

Urban mobility reloaded: Planning our future cities

By Dr. Arndt Pechstein

Our cities are constantly growing and an ever-rising number of people live on a very small fraction of the world’s surface area. By 2050, about 70% of the world’s population is expected to live in urban areas. Half of the population of Asia alone is predicted to live in cities by 2020. Over 60% of the land projected to become urban by 2030 remains yet to be built. Mobility no longer remains an optional luxury for an elite but has transformed into a non-negotiable to participate in society. Consequently, smart mobility solutions are gaining importance. How do we tackle such a challenge of global dimension? How do we serve people’s needs for mobility while simultaneously sacrificing neither biodiversity and environmental values nor human health and well-being?

The light bulb was not invented by improving the candle.”

Urban mobility Dr. Arndt Pechstein

Reinventing the wheel

Despite our pride of having invented the wheel (which is, by the way, not entirely true given that the golden wheel spider has been using wheel motion for millions of years before us) humans are not the only species tackling mobility challenges. In fact, mobility is an inherent phenomenon shared by all living systems. Everything alive moves, from cells to organisms to entire ecosystems. Over billions of years, organisms and systems have evolved to be remarkably adaptive to their surroundings with regard to transport, mobility, and logistics.

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Aug14

Evaporation: Closing the Gap between Forest and Urban Water Flows

By Jennifer Barnes and Alexandra Ramsden

Have you ever walked through an evergreen forest in the rain? There is a hush all around. The forest floor is spongy and soft beneath your feet, and the layers and textures all around you create a coziness, a feeling of being protected. As you take a deep breath of fresh, clean air, you know it’s raining big drops up above, but all you feel is a cool mist floating down through the canopy.

You can find expansive sections of this forest all around Puget Sound. For many people, it is a mental and spiritual health reservoir, a place that helps us reconnect and remember that we are nature. But it is also an ecosystem services powerhouse. It stores carbon, cleans the air and water, regulates temperatures, and provides shelter and food for critters big and small.

Before urban development, this forest dominated Seattle’s landscape. Dotted with bogs and meadows, with wetlands proliferating along the rich edges between forest and water, the vast majority of the region was forest. And the system operated in dynamic balance.

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Jan29

It’s a Biomimicry Bonanza at Living Future 2015

living futures un-conference

So … how many biomimics can we fit into one conference?

FOURTEEN of our colleagues and friends are speaking at the Living Future Institute 2015 un-conference April 1 – 3 in Seattle, with Janine Benyus keynoting.

Some of the hi-lights (there’s too many to list!) include a “Walking Exploration” in which participants will “learn how to interpret nature’s lessons with three leading biomimicry experts and apply them to design challenges in your own community”, as well as a discussion which will examine the value of and approach to incorporating deep ecological intelligence into a project.

We’re also excited about Cities that Function Like Forests: An Innovative Approach to Urban Resiliency with two Biomimicry Network founders.

Here’s the complete list of Biomimicry speakers:

 

Joe Zazzera

Green Plants for Green Buildings

Biomimicry Specialist

 

Tamsin Woolley-Barker

Biomimicry 3.8

Research Consultant

 

Christopher Lee Allen

Chris Allen + Associates

Owner

 

Jennifer Barnes

55-5 Consulting

Architect

 

Denise DeLuca

BCI: Biomimicry for Creative Innovation

Director

 

Eric Corey Freed

International Living Future Institute

VP of Global Outreach

 

Alexandra Ramsden

RUSHING

Associate Principal

 

Bill Reed

Regenesis

Principal

 

Josh Stack

Northeast Green Building Consulting, LLC

Attorney and Counselor at Law

 

Janus Welton

Eco Architecture Design Works, PC

Architect

 

Jane Toner

Melbourne Living Building Collaborative

Biomimicry Specialist

 

Kris Callori

EDI

CEO

 

Juan Rovalo

In Site

Founding Principal

Jan27

Revealing Nature’s Life-Friendly Chemistry at GreenBiz 2015

Learning from Nature

We’re excited to share that Mark Dorfman, a Biomimicry Chemist with Biomimicry 3.8, and board member of the BiomimicryNYC network will be presenting during the upcoming GreenBiz Forum 2015 to be held Feb. 17-19 in Phoenix, Arizona. Learn more about his session, One Great Idea: Leapfrogging the Missteps of the First Industrial Revolution. Mark will explore how to apply nature’s principles to the world of modern manufacturing.

Spider web: nature's green chemistry and patterns

“Biomimicry reveals the principles and patterns behind nature’s materials to inspire breakthrough products and processes,” Mr. Dorfman has explained in previous lectures.

“There is a misconception that chemicals are man-made entities that contaminate an otherwise chemical-free natural world. The truth is, nature is alive with chemistry. For example, scent is a language written in chemical sentences, punctuated with electrical impulses, and spoken with simple meaning or complex communication.”

There is so  much we can learn from nature-made materials, patterns and structures. For example, nature’s materials are hierarchically ordered chemical ecosystems of:
• Proteins
• Sugars
• Minerals

And with these parameters, our natural world creates materials that are high performing, multifunctional, beautiful and sustainable. An elegant and regenerative design brief for future products.

Nature is alive with chemistry

We look forward to hearing Mark speak and hope you will join the conversation in Arizona!

Also, feel free to use the Biomimicry Institute’s partner code for 10% off registration: GBF15BIOM

 

Photos courtesy of Shutterstock.com

 

Jan20

Global Biomimicry Design Challenge Launches Today!

Biomimicry Design Challenge

A chance to re-invent the way we nourish ourselves & our planet. https://t.co/v29CZSDXG3 #Biomimicry #DesignChallenge #BGDC2015

How can nature inspire us to design a better, healthier food system? The Biomimicry Institute and the Ray C. Anderson Foundation are inviting professionals and students from across the world to participate in a Biomimicry Global Design Challenge. Using biomimicry as a tool, participants are invited to tap into nature-inspired solutions to help solve key food and agriculture issues like food waste, food packaging, agricultural pest management, food distribution, energy use, and more.

Participants may be featured in high profile media and will have access to biomimicry experts, mentors, and valuable resources. Teams will be competing for cash prizes totaling $160,000, including the Ray C. Anderson Foundation $100,000 “Ray of Hope” Prize.

Many thanks to Louie Schwartzberg and his team at Moving Art, who generously donated their time and gorgeous cinematography for this video.

 

Info and video courtesy of The Biomimicry Institute.
Jan08

Crafting the Ultimate Post-Industrial Design Brief Using Biomimicry

Janine Benyus Paul Hawken at VERGE 2014

By Adiel Gavish

“What the industrial age has done is take life away from the planet and turn it into goods and services,” Paul Hawken stated at the 2014 VERGE Conference in San Francisco this past December. The annual event put on by Joel Makower, a former Biomimicry 3.8 Board Member and GreenBiz.com brings corporations and entrepreneurs together around the convergence of energy, buildings and transportation technologies which will “…enable radical efficiencies and huge opportunities.”

Mr. Makower interviewed both Janine Benyus and Paul Hawken around the idea of “running the industrial age backwards” and how nature can teach us how to undo the damage caused by unraveling the fabric of Earth’s balanced resources.

According to Paul Hawken the Industrial Age essentially takes “…concentrated materials, primarily from the lithosphere and from the biosphere and disperses them everywhere on the planet: in the oceans, in our atmosphere, in our air, lungs and everywhere else.”

He continued, “What we know from biomimicry, and looking at how life works is that, what nature does is, concentrate … What we’re talking about is technologies that imitate nature in the sense that they re-concentrate what the industrial age dispersed into our water, our soil, etc.,” and in a way that is beneficial to the planet, as opposed to degrading.

Janine explained, “In the natural world, what’s abundant is golden … life is really good at concentrating photons, grabbing fog and humidity out of the air, or collecting phosphor,” for example. Benyus then outlined the ultimate nature-inspired design brief for essentially any product in a post industrial era, in order to undo the damage already caused.

“It has to be made out of local, abundant, non-toxic, raw material,” she said, “cheap, and available everywhere. You’ve got to be able to recruit those materials at the end of their life. It has to be able to be repaired or self-healing, or so ubiquitous that it can be replaced easily … I think it’s very important that it’s built to shape – it can be made on a printing press. And that’s another reason why I’m excited about additive manufacturing and 3-D printing. If we get it right and use truly local, raw materials, we build them to shape. We add structure that we find from the natural world – because that’s what life does with fairly simple, raw materials.

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